the very important list of pc games part 1 5 - nivivir.cowhosting.net

 

The Very Important List Of Pc Games Part 1 5

  • Here at Rock, Paper, Shotgun we take the business of PC gaming entirely seriously. There is no smiling, or making rude noises at the back of class, there is only important gaming fact. So when it came to compiling an exhaustive list of the greatest, most important PC games of all time, we realised that the only way we could articulate the importance of the various titles was to present them as a five-part series of important lectures, explaining their importance. Over the next four articles and related appendices, you will discover why the various Great Games are great, and what their meaning is to you as a PC gamer. Follow this list, and play these games, and you will find yourself with very little spare time. But also, you will understand what it truly means to be a PC gamer.

  • . So thanks to them! And any developers reading should definitely make some All Time Best Games Ever alongside your apps, because that would just work out for everyone. Now then, lets make a list. The first lecturer to the podium is Dr Rossignol

  • Hello, everyone! What follows should be imagined as a Powerpoint slideshow, or similar, because I am making a presentation of, and an argument for, a bunch of games that I think are critical to the existence of PC gamers. And dont read this and then say “what about X-Com!”, because thats in Dr Meers lecture, along with a lot of very other important things.

  • This, as the title suggests, is simply Part One, and is the list of games that I am charged with talking about. By coincidence, I spend a lot of time talking about all the games that I think are important to the First Person Perspective dominance of so much of PC gaming. That really is actually an accident, but it seems like a useful one. And let me stress that these games are split between five essays, and that the full, merged list will be made public at the end of this five-part series. And with that reiterated, let us begin.

  • To start with Doom is not to start at the beginning, but to start at the most important: to climb atop a towering spike in the middle of the great graph of PC gaming development. We had already covered vast distances by the time Doom came along, but the point about Doom is that it is a landmark, a beacon, a waypoint, and a scene of transformation. It was not the first of the first-person games, but it was the point at which the first-person perspective took up its enormous significance within the landscape of PC gaming. Suddenly, our understanding of what kind of experience games were to offer had changed. There was suddenly depth, and zombies, and rocket-launchers, and cyber-demons. There was fear. But there was also co-op networked play, and user-made maps, and shareware versions of an incredible game circulated freely over the internet. If ever there is a triumphal arch through which PC gaming moved into a modern age, then it is the large M at the end of Doom. Does that metaphor work? No.

  • In the late Nineties the first-person shooter chewed up its cardboard packaging and combined it with a special saliva to make a chrysalis, into which it then crawled. What emerged from that miraculous tube of transformation was Half-Life, a game which made the world of a shooter game into seamless, dynamic, and intelligent thing. It was a remarkable trick: not diluting the action-element of the FPS, but impregnating every aspect of it with story. It was scripted, it had a script, but it never controlled the character or took the motive out of your hands. Half-Life was a game that made people realise that making interesting moments, staging microscoping dramas amid the carnage, would make games live anew. Things would never be the same again.

  • “Things would never be the same again,” seems a bit of a silly thing to say, but Ive said it now. Surely its always literally true? Anyway, Half-Life 2 wasnt quite the ecosystem-wrecking genesis-meteor that the original was, but instead articulated the mature statement of that previous games studio. Using all the same techniques, honed to razor-sharpness, and throwing in a brilliant set of physics-manipulating puzzles, Half-Life 2 broadened the mandate for first person games to include awesome companions, and puzzles that involved more than simply killing lots of similar-but-different enemy zombie-demons. It was also a game that its own exclamation: Physics! That is what we would cry.

  • Long before the Half-Lives, of course, there were other experiments in first-personess that really meant something. Chief among these in the mid-nineties was, arguably, System Shock. This was one of the games that acts like a landmark at the borders What Is Possible In Games. Lost in the belly of a giant space station and hunted by malignant AI, this game tore at definitions of both RPG and FPS, before either RPG or FPS were really defined. Made more playable today by a mouse-look mod, it remains a kind of masterwork of the balance between complexity and necessity in game design.

  • Counter-Strike was practically all that was played in the PC Gamer office when I arrived in 2001. The game has remained consistently popular on the wider internet since that time. As I will argue later, the Quakes represent a higher level of design in terms of multiplayer games, but I believe that Counter-Strike had a greater influence on game design than any other multiplayer shooter. The widespread shift towards pseudo-realism and “real-world” settings for manshooting can, I believe, be traced to this mod. That it was a mod, of course, has been celebrated for years, and as such it remains the ultimate example of how modding on the PC has had a profound influence on the entire culture of game design.

  • Battlezone was a rare and beautiful creation: a shooter that carried on the tradition of bold vehicular things like Carrier Command and Armageddon, but also sat in its own creative bubble. I regard Battlezone as crucially important because it did so many things that PC games do well: vehicles, terrain, genre-blending, and moving between tactics and strategy in a single engine. It also had an excellent fiction underlying it: of the Cold War extending into space, and then breaking out into violence on Mars. The difference between Russian and American sides still lingers in my imagination.

  • Yes, my evidence might not be entirely impartial on this one. I was hooked on Quake 3 from the day of its release for almost three years. The pace and precision of it became the most important thing in my life for quite some time, even losing me my job at the time. It remains Ids greatest work of game design, but its legacy was short, despite the continued life of the thing in Quake Live. Slower paced more “realistic” games quickly smothered the deathmatch future we were promised. Quake 3 is like a velociraptor of game design. Ultimately a dead end, evolutionary speaking, but a killer if you ever have to face it down in the real world. We shall never know its like again.

  • One of my colleagues will iterate the importance of Operation Flashpoint within the grand scheme of games, but it is down to me to highlight where the arc of soldier simulation, that began with OpFlash, now sits. Arma II – a huge, demanding, unoptimised monstrosity of feature heaviness – is unlike anything else in the gaming landscape. Buggy on release, not ideal for single-player – the problems with it are considerable, and they all pale into nothing against the technical achievement and possibility for military simulation experiences that are disgorged from this game on a daily basis.

  • It would please me to be able to say that Stalker was more important than it actually is, but it sadly remains one of those games that is out in an isolated intellectual region, unencroached by the large trade of ideas from other games. Plenty of games from the West have influenced Stalker, but Ive yet to see any Western studios mimicking GSCs achievements. Is that because Stalker is bad or unimportant? No, its because most game studios are basically boring, or hideously constrained. The lack of constraint that GSC were under for Call Of Pripyat shows (thankfully) that the brilliance of the original game wasnt all down to THQs money and expert producers.

  • in the game world of 2004 than the unfinished state of Bloodlines. This was a game that reached for the stars: a multi-threaded RPG with action elements, brilliant dialogue, a story that made sense and even surprised us at times. What a shame it degraded into a ludicrous meat-grinder at the end of the game, if you hadnt hit a show-stopping bug before that time. Bloodlines is important because it signposts a direction to a future of games that we were denied. It is a lament, and a warning. Its also brilliant.

  • If there was any need to explain the significance of Battlefield 2, then we only need to point to the hype being generated for its sequel, some six years on. Combining squad-based combat across huge maps, with realistic-but-actually-still-silly physics and general handling made this a videogame charged with manshoot satisfaction. It never really seemed to ever hit a perfect balance, either, which somehow seems quintessential of the most profoundly PC games.

  • That Team Fortress 2 is a sequel and a remake seems almost irrelevant now. But its part of what makes the game so important. Valve took years and years to settle upon a model for what has become one of the firmly-entrenched favourites of the PC gaming fraternity, and that they did so allowed it to prove that a multiplayer first-person shooter can be funny, even witty, and that constant experimentation and progression can keep a game alive and evolving long after it should have ground to a halt. Team Fortress 2 felt like an experiment, and it still feels like an experiment, and that experiment was a success.

  • Tribes 2, I would argue, was the game that made jetpack combat into one of the great trends within the overall current of first-person PC games. It was far from the first game to do it, and arguably games like Terra-Nova were more ambitious. The original Tribes had even defined the model, but it was this sequel that nailed everything down and made people behave as they now do towards anything with multiplayer combat, jetpacks, and some vehicles.

  • Its at this point in my list that I begin to trundle away from the first-person perspectives and its unfair dominance over the game universe to look at some games that use other perspectives. Hidden Dangerous, for example, used a third-perspective across a squad of special ops characters conducting clever missions in exciting World War II scenarios. This game is important because it was the subject of the sample review I produced for my interview at PC Gamer magazine, thus getting me through the door of the industry. It was probably a fairly good game, too.

  • There was one game whose hype took me in completely. It was one of my earliest tastes of a company called Bullfrog. Oh how we laugh when we look back on it. But the truth was that Syndicate was a genuine marvel, a miracle of the technology of the time, and one of the first instances in which a city environment in a game felt more like the protagonist than the people who milled about in it. In my dream world, Syndicate would have spawned half a dozen imitators, while the main series would have produced a new game every couple of years, and not just its solitary sequel, Syndicate Wars. Its one of those games whose atmosphere, attitude, and even control system (as weird as that now seems, with the all the drugs and stuff) acts as a kind of primitive, basal benchmark for all subsequent game experiences. If you played it when it came out, of course. Its one of those games that seems less important today. That said, this will be the game that I feel most brutalised over if, when the rumoured sequel emerges, it ends up being a wonky shooter set in the same universe. Anyway, thats for another rant, and another time. Syndicate is extremely important.

  • Until there was Outcast, the only real champion of the 3D pixel, the voxel, was to be found in the dry military duck-shoots of the Novalogic games (Delta Force, Comanche). Then along came a Belgian adventure game with lush, organic valleys, and a vibrant, living world. The all-American protagonist never really made much sense, but it faded into the background when you began to encounter the behaviours of the worlds characters, and to explore a game that spun away from the galaxy of games like a lone supernova into the blackness of space. A bright light, quickly vanishing from the pantheon. Outcast perhaps isnt so much important as valuable, because there is only one of it.

  • In the big scheme of RPGs, the original Neverwinter Nights really doesnt register all that profoundly, and my colleagues will no doubt speak of other, far more significant games. What was extraordinary about NWN, however, was that it managed to take the naming scheme from Baywatch Nights and then create an RPG that finally was hinged on decent technology. We played a four-player RPG at lunchtimes in the PC Gamer office. This is the only time I can ever remember that happening. Later, we played user-made adventures, which is a vital and wonderful thing. In terms of broad-spectrum importance, this game sits fairly low, but I think its accomplishments merit a tip of the hat to where it sits on my shelf, gathering dust.

  • The importance of this game is that it made both typing tutor programs and light-gun games actually fun. That means it fixes two entire genres by creating another one. Few games can boast that. Also: the dudes with keyboards strapped to their waists were beautifully weird. Actually, Ive emailed Sega to ask if they have any plans to bring this minor classic out on any digital distribution networks. They are looking into it. UPDATE: Sega just said no comment at the time of going to press.

  • The importance of this side-on sci-fi adventure was that it both taught me what rotoscoping was, and allowed me to pass my GCSE French, because I played it in French for some reason. These reasons for importance may not apply to other people playing the game today. However, it taught us that French people can often make amazing videogames, and that platform games dont have to be about grotesquely-proportioned plumbers. These were, and remain, vitally important lessons.

  • Please note that this post is but one fragment of a larger list, which in total covers over 100 of what RPS feels is the PC’s most important games (but not all of them). You can find the other parts to date

  • Now I understand the symbol that is Doom and why its difficult not to put it on top, but for the few of us here who were PC gamers years before Doom, well sure it was a landmark but not the biggest one. Technically it was beautiful, but not half as ambitious in term of 3D, physics, AI than Ultima Underworld. Yes, UU had gravity pulling down object on the ground, goblins able to flee and regroup, fireballs lignting the walls, you could watch up or down, there could be bridges. And I am not even mentionning half of what was insanely brilliant in that 1992s game on year before Doom. Ive starved for the whole industry trying to follow Ultima Underworlds step and it seems to me we had to wait for ages before we start to get other games that were just half as good than this gem apart from the other Looking Glass titles of course ; System Shock is absolutely great oc.

  • Even if Doom had never been released, I believe that after both the Wolfenstein 3D and Ultima Underworld (and the Bethesda Terminator games), those ideas would have eventually found their successful culmination in some other game.

  • Right, the thing is, this isnt a list of what games we like. Or rather, it is, but its more primarily a list of games that are importance. Whatever you think of their relative merits, its hard to deny that Doom had far more influence on the games industry than Ultima Underworld did. Thus, it is not only more importance, it is more first on this list.

  • Well, it totally depends on what you mean by importance. I love Doom as much as the next person. But I see System Shock as far more important, especially now. If they keep churning out generic shooters for too much longer games are going to die a slow death in their own excrement.

  • Its not a complete list and it can never be, because youve listed games that havent had the impact you wish they did. Which is subjective, leaving it open for everyone on here who holds a flame for the obscure to call you a cunt for not mentioning their beloved.

  • @Jim: Thats what you get for making an ordered list of games: a shitload of comments in the format X should be (higher) on the list because its better than Y. Please dont turn this site into GamesRadar!

  • Battlezone 98 had such a fluid interface it made the command and control parts almost instinctive. It really is an amazing game and has been released for free out on the net. If you havent tried it yet at least give it a shot. It is really fun.

  • “Things would never be the same again is a silly thing to say, since its a tautology and not relevant here anyway. Half-Life 2 wasn’t quite the ecosystem-wrecking genesis-meteor that the original was, but instead the leftovers of the original reheated. Using all the same techniques, but throwing in a half-arsed set of perfunctory physics puzzles, Half-Life 2 broadened the mandate for first person games to include half-arsed, perfunctory physics puzzles, and much longer and more frequent bits that supposedly arent cut-scenes because you can walk around the room while theyre taking place, which conveniently also means theyre unskippable and thus unbearably tedious by the second or third time around.

  • ) so Ill add here that I think youve stumbled into a well of internet pain RPS. You do so well to avoid those fucking stupid numbers when you review games (much like Sight and Sound dont use a five star rating to review films and are one of the most well respected authorities on critically assessing cinema) and then you slip into the treacherous quasi-quantative area of lists. Id remove all the degrees of import from here on in lest the drooling masses die from rage induced aneurisms and you are found guilty as they lay dead at their keyboards.

  • Id agree with that. B1942 was a real whoa! moment for me in videogames, and I only played it a few times in multiplayer. Just the sheer scale of the maps and the variety of the action was epic. Other games might have done it with more polish since, but I dont think anythings captured that epic war feel like 1942.

  • Oh god, I had completely forgotten how much I loved TIE Fighter. Too bad games like I-War sort of ruined the x-wing flight model for me. If only I could some day enjoy Larry Hollands games and Freespace again :(

  • Man Ive only played 7, and most of those not all the way to the end. (nearly 4 years in Ive yet to complete TF2) Hopefully the other lists allow me to more confidentially say Yes, Ive played important games!!

  • Im just gonna guess its a combination of most of these games preceding my career as a gamer, even more as a PC gamer, and most on the fact Ive only recently started to actively go hunting down FPS games.

  • The games that you played in your own personal history of PC gaming are important to YOU and your understanding of the art form. Dont let any old subjective list deny your own moments of peering under the lid of PC games and thinking back with nostalgia.

  • Also, sometimes you just cant go back and rekindle the spark that once blazed for 3-6 months a decade ago. Trust me, I have had moments of weakness where I tried to play some classic I missedthey were painful and I lost part of my soul.

  • I found all the X Wing games had the same strategic problems. Unless youve played through a few times, youre not going to know to be in the right spot for the right attack. But then, one of the great things about the whole series was that you were given an objective and expected to meet it. Going off mission in most cases meant failure unless you did do something jammy like take out that tie spamming star destroyer in an YWing.

  • @Monchberter: The time windows were bigger with the later games. If you werent exactly in the right place at the right time but within reasonable distance, youd still manage to compensate with good flying and fighting in TIE Fighter and beyond. In X-Wing you were pretty much screwed under the same circumstances.

  • So many great games and great memories. Ive always wondered where Uprising and its sequel rank in the Battlezone genre though. The Battlezone remake shared more with Uprising than the original Battlezone, although they are still very different beasts at heart.

  • Big thumbs up for including Battlezone on this list. There may be others I dont particularly agree with, but this makes up for it. Sad sad day that the hover-tank/strategy/shooter genre didnt catch on because it was fast, fun, yet you had to think.

  • No, Im not being snarky or putting the game down here. Im just noting that for the purposes of this list, a major facet of being important is being influential, and its hard for a game to be influential if it is obscure. (There are influential but obscure games, because game developers might play those obscure games and be inspired. I dont think that happened with Vampire.)

  • Im not sure if I agree with Jims reasoning on L4D here though. He seems to think its because of the co-op play. Maybe so for PC games, but co-op is something that consoles have always had, from splitscreen to Sonic amp; Tails in Sonic 2. Even Gears of War had built-in online co-op for the entire campaign in 2006, two years before L4D (and Im not pretending that that game was the first to do that, it just springs to mind).

  • Also, to the previous comment, games had Gears of War style co op since Doom (possibly longer, but you get my point). But no games managed to let you play a narrative where all the players were truly involved in it and necessary.

  • In this case, I guess they got sponsorship to talk about a list, but dont actually really feel like talking about a list (which inherently includes arguing of why A was included when B wasnt, even assuming the list isnt ordered). Thus the awkward partitioning into parts. The partitioning isnt by category (e.g. FPS then RPG) nor is it by editor (e.g. here are Zs most important games), nor is it by ranking (e.g. starting with the least important of the X most important games and working up), and the ordering is within group (and maybe only this groupmaybe the final list wont even be ordered). Its the perfect format for people who have to post a list but dont actually want to talk about a list.

  • Im always alarmed when it comes to most important games of all time lists, at just how many Ive played. I hit ten on this list, although far fewer if you take those Ive played to completion, or for an extended period of time. I imagine the percentage will be higher on Professor Walkers list, as we seem to share a similar taste in games.

  • 1) Half-Life 2 in top 3? ORLY? It was as creative game as random new COD sequel. Yea, Yea, it had some puzzles in game but. gash, thats seriously nothing new. Maybe the new thing is using physics in puzzles but nope, thats also nothing new than maybe the new thing is using the physics is puzzles in FPS game? Ok, that would work but the importance of this event is huge enough to place it somewhere on the bottom of 100-most-important-games ever.

  • 2) Battlezone I loved this game but it wasnt really so much important due to it being its own unique type of game, kinda like the X-series is. It doesnt make it more important than precursors of dozens similar games, such as for example the Frontier. Actually few other games on the list fall into this category Outcast, TF, NwN.

  • Flashback was hugely important for some technical reason that I cant remember. I think it was the first game to prove you could have smoothly scrolling graphics on the PC or something like that. I know this because I actually played it way back when thanks to a chap who opened a PC game library in my local town that allowed to to rent (nudge nudge wink wink) brand new PC games for a fiver a week. You actually got to keep the box with the original floppies for a week after which you returned them and scouts honour deleted the game from your hard drive.

  • Yeah, there are MMOFPSRPGs out there (Neocron, Fallen Earth, Darkfall, but so far they all have big issues). But that isnt what were talking about. Planetside (and World War II Online) are the only games out there that have tried to simulate a war with combined arms, massive battles and territory control.

  • first full 3D strategy game. And full 3d meaning full 3d, not just 3D units. GOTY 1999, a game that created the Relic studios later resposible for dozens of well known titles, as DoW or COH. It was also one of a very few strategy games having in-depth storyline behind them back in 99s. Even though we have almost 12 years passed since the release theres almost no space strategies keeping quality level of the Homeworld series so youd better learn the history a bit. ;)

  • So in other words it changed nothing? If RPS created a reverse version of this list, Games That Should Have Been Important But Werent, I would but Homeworld near the top of that list. But in this list, it doesnt belong at all. Remember, this list is not about quality, its about importance. They are different things.

  • But then Jim listed several games that led nowhere. That were notable for being the high point in what they tried to do (Planetside (a depressingly low high point honestly, MMOFPS could be so much more than what Planetside will ever be), Battlezone, Syndicate etc). Remember that other members of the hivemind might be more suitable to bring up some of these games later, but I think you have to consider this article as games that Jim thinks are important rather than list of most influential PC games or list of best PC games.

  • Very good point there are a number of games on this list that also really belong on a Not Important But Should Be list, really. Its a rather idiosyncratic list. But isnt that why we love RPS?

  • i think the problem with this list is that rather than it is clearly just a list of not necessarily the most important games in history but rather the games you that Jim and so on think you have to play because they were brilliant, genre defining or just signifcant. this is not clear in the intro

  • What a bullshit list. How can you include forgettable titles such as Quake 3 and leave out the seminal 1989 title Barbie Princess Dress Up the game that launched a million flash games for girls websites. Want proof:

  • In fact let me state right here right now that Rock Paper Shotgun is abysmally failing in its mission to represent PC gaming by entirely neglecting to cover the enormous market segment that is dress up games.

  • Apart from that unforgiveable oversight though respect for including Sacrifice. I thought Kieron was the only games reviewer who understood how brilliant that game really was but I am delighted to see that is not the case.

  • Outcast another great title that fell by the wayside, one of the first proper movie games that did their homework on action/adventure movies then applied that to a game, way before the current Uncharted franchise which does the same.

  • Oh Hidden amp; Dangerous! How I love thee! And how I weep at your very mention! For being the first PC game I played after years of console games! For the cruel lack of you being mentioned more on RPS! And because it took me a fucking week to get off your first level! Bastard Germans. Stupid train. Bloody rain.

  • Im not really into spitting vitriol over lists (an odd flaw that makes me feel as disconnected from the majority as my at-best documentarianist link to foot-to-ball) and wouldnt disagree with the importance of lots of the lovingly-big-boxed games Jims highlighted. But the relative importance he gives to Quake 3 over something like Neverwinter Nights speaks of the myriad, utterly different pathways towards gaming nirvana I guess weve all taken, even if we all eventually agree on Deus Ex as a Rather Wonderful Thing.

  • All of these decisions though turned out to be in aid of multiplayer, in the most expensive sense of the word. I see NWN as an early ambassador for the type of gaming Clint Hocking posits in his lectures; games which link between players on a number of different levels, which dont force group interaction but enable an incredible experience for those who seek it out. Games which grow in the public imagination after release rather than diminish.

  • The problem with this list is that we dont know what to expect.I mean part 1 has a lot of FPS but not only fps,so the problem is will there be any other fps in the other parts and if there are how are we gonna compare them with the ones on this list?Thats why people complaining about games which are not on the list.

  • Great game indeed, sadly the closest thing to it is probably SWAT 4 and neither have a sequel that Im aware of (the other rainbow 6 games dont count.. although I enjoyed them for what they were).

  • I really enjoyed SWAT4 but never got heavily into the adversarial multiplayer aspect. As a coop game though, SWAT4 was pretty intense. Perhaps too intense by todays standards, and may alienate people looking for a slightly quicker (and less punishing) thrill. Lockdown, the game right after Raven Shield, was truly dire, but the Vegas games were much better (than Lockdown). Unfortunately they completely lost the solidity, if you will, and straightforwardness of Raven Shields multiplayer in the Vegas games.

  • So it completely baffles me that sites routinely mention Blood Money over any of the Splinter Cell games, which seem better in every possible way: graphically, audibly, plot, control, gameplay, balance, level design.

  • Is the amusement park level totally unrepresentative of the full game? Whats the deal? Why on earth are respected websites including Blood Money in their essential PC games lists at the expense of Splinter Cell or Thief? plz explain.

  • Partly true. Still the duel mode in Q3 was a vast improvement over QW and still is. Both games have evolved immensly in playing style (you cant really compare QW multiplayer from 99 with todays) and I think both games deserve to be mentioned. For my part even Q2 is missing from this list ;) Yes.. I am a Quake fan :(

  • I was sad that Future vs Fantasy never took off. Team Fortress basically took the original quake weapons, and distributed them randomly to particular classes, and then made some run slower and some faster. There werent any legitimate new classes. People just liked it because you started with your weapons already available.

  • I always felt UT 2003/04 was just the first game with better graphics and less maps. How can a game that was essentially a remake/update but so highly influential. Unless of course your saying it was purely the engine that was so influential. I know it had a fair few mods, and several games were built on the UT03 engine, but that can be said for alot of engines in the post 2000 era (maybe before too)

  • I really like a lot of the games Jim picked. Its great to see games like Outcast, Sacrifice and Bloodlines at least mentioned in passing, even if they didnt influence the games industry all that much.

  • As always with this kind of list there are some games that I think shouldve been included. Freelancer for its brilliant introduction of mouse-movement in a space simulator, even if it never actually managed to revive the (best) gaming genre. Return to Castle Wolfenstein for introducing the concept of objective-based multiplayer with classes that has effectively become a requirement in every modern multiplayer shooter. Omikron: The Nomad Soul might have been mentioned along with Outcast for providing a (somewhat) similar gameplay experience. Deus Ex and there are probably a fair few more.

  • I would certainly replace that with its ultimate predecessor. After all, Unreal Tournament was the game that sparked a massive and prolific mod scene that completely overshadowed the modding communities in any other game at the time (even Half Life). It was this enormous mod scene and the popularity of these mods then inspired Epic to expand the modding capabilities in their future games, not the other way around. It was also the first multiplayer shooter to successfully compete with an ID Software shooter in terms of popularity and it dominated LAN parties for years. In fact, its still by far the most popular game in the entire Unreal franchise to this day, with well in excess of a thousand consecutive players still fragging it up in the vanilla game every night at European prime time. UT2004 is lucky to hit a couple hundred players if you also count the players of its most popular mod (Team Arena Master) at prime time.

  • Even if only a tiny fraction of those who bought the game created content, a far more sizeable number played user created mods. For the best part of 2 years NWN was basically the only game I played. With NWN2 the content was harder to create, and by the time Dragon Age came along the complexity of the game had far exceeded the ability of most to create a decent adventure.

  • Im very much looking forward to this series. For several reasons, not the least of which is receiving an education on some of the important games that were slightly before my time. It seems like a nice mix of mainstream and obscure, vital and simply influential.

  • Starbreeze (Riddick games) are working on a new Syndicate based game. Im hoping its not an MMO, personally and Starbreeze arent really a large enough studio to handle a game of that nature anyway. I agree that the setting would be good for an MMO though. Its just not something Id be all that interested in personally.

  • does anyone else find it depressing that 90% of these games are War Man 2: The Shootening even the screen shots and cover art are all the same. a big machine-thing or soldier holding a big gun on a battlefield.

  • I remember the day a friend brought me the original Doom on a bunch of disks. I felt dirty, installing it, because Id heard things. You know. Horrible things. The violence, the satanism, all that. I was 13, but I knew I wasnt that kind of gamer. I liked Railroad Tycoon and Prince of Persia and Civilization. You know, wholesome games. (Except for the part where theres a fight in Prince of Persia that you can basically only win by making a fat man step into a guillotine, which then graphically turns him into two half-as-fat men)

  • Fast forward a year and I had finally convinced my dad to buy me a 486 DX2-66 (66 megahertz!) DooM II was now the game of the hour. I installed it at a LAN party a friend was hosting in his parents living room. The rest, as they say, is history.

  • I was a gamer before I played DooM II. DooM II is what turned me into a PC Gamer. DooM II is the game that made me a person who couldnt think of a better way to spend his Easter holidays than sitting in a smelly room with five good friends and pretty much play LAN games all day and all night. It made me into the person who, come autumn holidays, set out to do the same thing again, but this time ended up sitting in a smelly room with his best friends working on Duke3D maps. Wed all sit there with Build loaded up, building silly things (first rule of BUILDingyour first level must be your parents house) (second rule of BUILDingyou must get the dimensions horribly, amusingly wrong). Actually the others would build, and then hand their .MAP files over to me, so I could put the explosions in. I was the explosions guy, shrinking gas canisters to zero width so they wouldnt show up in game, and rigging them up to certain explosion triggers, setting explosion delays manually so theyd paint pretty spirals as they went off into the sky.

  • Doom is the most important game ever made for pretty obvious reasons, most of them listed in the article here. It paved the way for first person shooters of all types, and the general gameplay is still a staple of todays games. We can look in three dimensions instead of two, we have stories, the guns fire different things, but in the end every FPS owes much of its heart to id software. Thats why Ill always have a lot of love for that company, and Ill be giddy as a schoolgirl when Doom 4 is announced.

  • There does need to be some kind of PLAY AND UNDERSTAND THESE, YOU DOLTS catalogue for games developers. Even though I dont like some of the games on here, and disagree that some should be on there, if I were a games developer, I should be looking them up and giving them a damn good playing anyway.

  • Incidentally, I hope that Johns list is made up entirely of strategy games. And that theres a final ultra-list, made up of Deus Ex fifty times. Each one of whichs description is simply I spill my drink!.

  • A franchise that, like most of ids games, is really primarily important for the engine that was delivered to be used in other, much better games. Ugly, bland, simplistic, and far behind other concurrent or even previous games in the genre (Marathon, System Shock, the better Build Engine games) in terms of genuine gameplay coolness. Sure, it introduced 3D, but 3D is in itself just a technical achievement. Quake failed to make it -interesting-.

  • While it was originally a mod for the old Unreal , its evolution as a total conversion for the old Unreal Tournament made it something very important in my gaming career : Infiltration, because it influenced a lot my taste in games.

  • I have to say I think Planetsides importance is overrated. Im not denying its positive qualities, but I think it belongs in the same bin as Eve: great game, which had absolutely no influence on other games.

  • If the following games are not on the list by the time it is done, I will label you all console whores/just not cool people. And forward your website to Eric Cartman, Duke Nukem, and the grand poobah huzzah of kochonland:

  • Battlezone has remained one of my favorite games ever since I first played it so many years ago. It is unfortunate so few games have come out in the last thirteen years that have tried to improve upon melding the world of vehicle combat and RTS so well. Sure, the AI sucked and the command interface was clunky, but the ambition Activision had back then was simply amazing.



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